Review of ‘Musings on Hinduism’

A book review of ‘Musings on Hinduism’ by Nithin Sridhar, Editor, IndiaFacts.org — http://www.amazon.in/Musings-Hinduism-Nithin-Sridhar/dp/9383826304

This is a valuable book that should be meant for non-Hindus, but which has to be read by the now so-called Hindus themselves. It is a sad state of affairs that that which was understood and practised by our ancestors (and almost the entire Bharatiya society) just a dozen or less generations ago has to be explained from the basics to the current generation. And that too in the language of the English, who are known for their love of loot, boot and slavery sarkar across the globe.

In fact, it is doubly shameful that this pitiable situation is the direct result of an intellectual assault on a superior, more peaceful and egalitarian society by a “civilisation” that had to even import (model) its language’s grammar structure based on Panini’s splendid treatise. Yet in Bharat, the “elite” is in fawning awe of the language of the loot, boot and slavery Sarkarites; what better evidence does one need for an utter failure of the value of meritocracy in Bharat? In a Freudian sense, perhaps this reflects what the English-speaking “elite” in Bharat, deep in their heart, aspire to.

De-debasing sex: Again, a regressive moral scale is being used by a society taken to debauchery to adjudge the validity of a natural phenomenon common to all social animals. This book comes as a refreshing introduction to the ill-informed, self-hating or confused Hindus-in-Name-Only (HiNOs) about the beauty of tantra and the higher spiritual aspects of sex. Whereas Freudian theories are obsessed with it, like a balanced and truly scientifically spirited people, our ancestors have revealed the best of humanity even in the most mundane of physical pleasures by the exposition and practice of tantras.

The biblical framework of the exalted sciences: It was not long ago that the Western scientists laughed at the concept of time, as in yugas, as being otherworldly and ridiculous, because their framework of time was the biblical creation by a man-created god, that is 4000–5000 years. Shamed by their own later scientific discovery of the age of the universe being equally otherworldly, they have become mute.

However, the self-proclaimed social “scientists” have yet to learn their lessons. Because all they play with is hi-story? There are and there will be innumerable such facts to count. This is not a place to list it out. The most recent being the Western neuroscientists “researching” consciousness. Do they even have an acceptable definition of what mind is, let alone consciousness?

Yet, no time is lost in making fun of the literal or misinterpreted meanings of Hindu symbols that are almost always multi-layered, multi-dimensional metaphors. Perhaps it is time for the colonised, enslaved sepoy minds and their “loot, boot and Sarkarites” masters to acid wash their brain, hoping it reboots their state-funded, fat-clogged neurons into action.

This excellent book starts with an excellent introduction to a well-defined framework that the Hindu schools of philosophies used over many millennia. Perhaps there is no better way to explain to both the theologists and the social “scientists” the fundamental requirement for a proper referential framework, if only they will read. And they should explain how an omnipresent, omniscient and omnipotent man-created god can be omnipresent and still be only present (in limitation) in a heaven that excludes earth and hell?

A lesson in logic is a matter of urgency for these self-proclaimed sciences and theologies, before they can be even allowed to debate, let alone critique, what is Brahman and even better, multi-millennia old schools of philosophies that come under the umbrella of Hindu Dharma.

“The knower of Brahman, verily becomes Brahman” quotes the author in this book at various places and very appropriately so. The author of this review wishes, the book’s author also explicitly state what do the westernised social “scientists” and our very own intellectually colonised sepoys know to become what they have become!

Limitations: As with most English texts on Hindu Dharma, there will be major limitations due to the inherent limitations of Sanskrit non-translatables as pointed out by various scholars elsewhere, such as Rajiv Malhotra. It would have been useful if the Sanskrit verses followed a standard: some are transliterated in plain English, some using IAST standards and some are in Devanagari scripts. It will be much better if the author uses IAST transliteration and Devanagari scripts, both, in future editions. Given the nature of the target audience — even deeply Hinduphilic authors like Nithin are forced to simplify and water down the immense truths that underlie everything in Hindu Dharma.

(Acknowledgements: Thanks to Shri Sudarshan T Nadathur for the review of the draft)


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About the Author

Murali KV
A medic and a graduate of the University of Cambridge, England, involved in inter-disciplinary research for the inculcation of a scientific rigour in the outdated fields of humanities: putting “science” into social sciences