Old Hindu Man Assaulted by Pakistani Cop For Eating in Public During Ramzan

An old Hindu man, Chacha Gokal Das was brutally assaulted by a Muslim policeman, Mir Hussain Hydrani, in Sindh, Pakistan for daring to eat in public (just outside his home), 40 minutes before the Iftar (after dusk) meal at which Muslims break their Ramzan fast.

According to news site Pak Tea House –

“This is photo of injured old man, Chacha Gokal Das who was beaten by policeman Mir Hussain Hydrani for eating rice outside his home at 6:30pm, 40 minutes before Iftar in Ramzan. Where has the tolerance of people gone? Can this old man of your father, or perhaps grandfather’s age, pose threat to your faith or fast? Simply, shame on you coward, spineless and pigeon-heart creep. If you are pious enough, then stop corruption u do, at least in this month, stop harassing people and stop imposing rules only on marginalized people.

We strongly condemn this inhumane treatment of old man and demand SSP Masood Ahmed Bangash to take action against the culprit.”

While Muslims observe a dawn to dusk fast during the month of Ramzan (or Ramadan), non-Muslims living in Muslim-majority nations or regions also face a formal/informal ban on eating & drinking in public spaces, as this article shows:

“During the 30 days of Ramadan, fasting Muslims around the world will observe strict rules, including abstaining from eating, drinking, smoking and engaging in sexual relations between sunrise and sunset.

Non-Muslims, too, will be expected to respect the local culture in many Islamic countries, and should be aware of certain rules and regulations.

There are strict fines in some Islamic countries, as well as possible jail time, for eating, drinking, smoking and even chewing gum in public – including in their own cars – during daylight hours. In the UAE, for instance, fines can range from AED2,000-2,500 and/or a one- or two-month jail sentence. Getting let off with a warning is a possibility, but not guaranteed. In Egypt, citizens and foreigners can be arrested for a misdemeanour offence if caught, while in Indonesia penalties can include flogging.

While non-Muslims are not expected to fast, showing courtesy and consideration for those who are fasting is expected. During the day, non-Muslims can eat in designated areas, usually behind screens. Some hotels, shopping mall food courts and restaurants will remain open – but discreetly – so it is best to plan ahead by calling them to find out.”