Bakr-Eid: the annual festival when rules are broken & animals openly slaughtered, while elites look away

As Muslims across the country gear up to celebrate Bakr-Eid, so do civic authorities & rest of the citizens hunker down to deal with the disturbing issue of ritual animal slaughter in the open.

On Tuesday, the Mumbai High Court prohibited the slaughter of sheep/goats within residential flats in Mumbai during Bakr-Eid festival. But the court did not restrain the grant of permission by Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai to carry out slaughter in open spaces of housing societies.

Back in 2016 too, the Mumbai High Court had held that city residents are entitled to sacrifice goats within their building premises and housing societies on the occasion of Bakrid.

So in effect, the non-Muslim residents of such housing societies can expect a rerun of what one such resident described in this article. This legalized public brutality exposes young children to the sights of animals throats being slit, blood flowing all around, and poses a serious health hazard; but it is still not condemned by our elites – all in the name of ‘secularism’. But the very mention of firecrackers on Diwali causes a wave of outrage & disgust amongst this chatterati.

Meerut administration tries to enforce the law on Bakr-Eid – the Yogi effect?

Dainik Jagran reports that in Meerut, for the first time ever the administration managed to convince the Muslim community to stay off the city roads for the Friday namaz. In the past, namaz used to be offered on the roads in front of the various masjids across the city, causing those roads to be closed for the duration of namaz & inconveniencing other citizens.

This time, police worked with the city’s Muslim religious heads to ensure that the rule of staying off the roads was strictly implemented across all masjids. The Friday namaz was conducted with heavy police deployment in at least 55 mosques located in ‘sensitive’ areas of Meerut. Despite the improvement, at places the namazis still spilled over onto the footpaths.

Credit: Dainik Jagran

Despite slaughter of camels being banned by the FSS (Food Safety & Standards) Act & also by courts, it seems the practise is very much popular in Meerut & other towns. During this Bakr-Eid festival season, police have confiscated 25 camels, most of which have been sent back to Rajasthan, but none of the smugglers have been caught.

The report adds that some Muslims like Bandu Khan Ansari, President of New Weavers Welfare Association, are openly upset with this ban on camel slaughter, despite the fact that camel population has plummeted drastically in the country from over a million to just 200,000 in the last 20 years or so, and prohibition of offering namaz on the roads.

Representative image of camel slaughter (Source: Twitter)

Another disturbing development in Meerut’s animal slaughter trade on Bakr-Eid is goats being fed beer by some unscrupulous traders, in order to increase the animal’s weight and get a better price. At times, water is pumped through the animal’s mouth to increase weight!

Going by the extent of the coverage provided in local Hindi newspapers, it is evident that issues like Friday namaz spilling onto roads and illegal animal slaughter in the open during Bakr-Eid are a major inconvenience to residents of cities like Meerut where Muslims form 35% of the population. Yet, English-language newspapers read by metro dwellers never ever cover such issues, but are chock-a-block with reports of environmental, health & civic issues allegedly caused by Hindu festival celebrations.

And our elites continue looking the other way when an actor like Irrfan Khan bravely speaks up against the medieval practise of sacrificing animals, or when PETA activist Benazir Suraiya is brutally attacked by fanatic Muslims in Bhopal for promoting a vegetarian Eid.

Moreover, if the odd CM like Yogi Adityanath does try to implement the law fairly on Muslims too, our liberal elites go into a collective dirge about ‘minority rights’ being crushed.

(Featured Image: Representative only)


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