Irshad urinates on Shivling in Bulandshahr, apprehended due to alertness of local Bajrang Dal

The cycle of desecrations of Hindu mandirs throughout Bharat continues unabated. It has been barely 6 days since the mob attack on a Durga mandir in Delhi, and news now comes of a Muslim person named Irshad urinating on the Shivling in the popular Purani Mandi area of Bulandshahr. This news also was hardly covered by any large media house, but Sudarshan TV News has filed a report on it.

Irshad had been seen loitering around the Shiv ling for several days, and then one night he was caught red-handed while urinating on the Shivling by a Bajrang Dal worker. In the commotion, Irshad managed to escape. A complaint has been lodged with the local police, and Irshad has been arrested.

In just the last few days, attacks on mandirs in Shamli, Nanded, Delhi, and now this urination in Bulandshahr have been reported by local or smaller media groups. One wonders how often such instances happen throughout the length and breadth of Bharat. Yet there is absolutely no coverage of these incidents in the mainstream media.

For perspective, let us remember that in Pakistan, the penalty for blasphemy is death. Recently, a Hindu doctor quite innocently wrapped his medicines in old textbook paper (common practice among vaids and doctors everywhere). Unfortunately for him, the textbook paper also had some verses from an Islamic religious education class. This was enough for a blasphemy charge to be slapped on him. Not only that, the local Muslim population went on a rampage, burning Hindu shops and properties.

And in Bharat, Muslim mobs attack our temples, urinate on our deities, openly speak filthy language against our Goddesses; and yet they are the ones considered ‘oppressed’?


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About the Author

Vinay Kumar
Devout Hindu and practising brahmin, very interested in history and current affairs of Bharat. Do not believe in birth-based "caste" but rather varna based on swadharma and swabhava, and personal commitment to that varna's dharmas. I don't judge people by the religion they profess: every human being should be treated with equal dignity. At the same time, I don't judge a religion by the people I know who profess it. A religion, like any doctrine, should be subjected to critical examination using facts and reason.