#JusticeForNimrita: Suspected murder of Hindu Medical Student in Sindh, Pakistan

In yet another incident of fatal violence against minorities in Pakistan, a final year medical student belonging to the Hindu community was found dead in her hostel room. While authorities are trying to pass it off as a suicide, the victim’s brother, himself a doctor, says that the marks on her neck and other parts of body are not consistent with suicide.

Nimrita Kumari, a resident of Ghotki, was found dead in her hostel room of Chandka Medical College. The Vice Chancellor of the University, Dr. Aneela Attaur Rahman, told reporters that the incident could be suicide. She said that SSP Larkana was investigating the mysterious incident and police had sealed the room.

However, Nimrita’s brother, Dr. Vishal, has claimed that his sister did not commit suicide. While talking to media, he denied that this was a case of suicide as he had talked to his sister just two days before and she seemed happy and expressed that she would be in the top ten students this year. He added that just 1.5 hours before her death, she had distributed sweets in the principal’s office.

Dr. Vishal added that the first girl who came across Nimrita’s body found her with a duputta around her neck. But the marks on her neck indicated the use of a wire. Moreover, the marks were lower down on the neck than they would be if someone commits suicide. The victim’s brother also said that there were marks on Nimrita’s hands as if someone had gripped her forcefully.

Social media users also opined that the case did not seem to be that of suicide. Activist Aisha Sarwari took to Twitter and even alleged possibility of rape before murder.

Just a couple of days back, Ghotki had witnessed an anti-Hindu pogrom following blasphemy allegations against a Hindu school teacher.

Yet another bright young Hindu life has been snuffed out in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan. While the condition of women on the whole is pitiable in Pakistan, minority women have it much worse. We can only hope that Nimrita Kumari’s family get justice, and she doesn’t become just another forgotten name in the long list of Hindus awaiting justice.


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