Mother of 2 converts for Nikah with Facebook friend, murdered by new husband

A married woman who had eloped with a lover she met on Facebook, met a gory end when the same lover/new husband strangled her to death after his first wife found out about his second marriage.

As per Hindi daily Amar Ujala, Nidhi Sharma (33) was married to Sanjay Mishra and resided in East Delhi’s Brahmpuri locality along with their two boys aged 5 & 7. She befriended a Muslim carpenter named Intezar on Facebook and soon they fell in love. On 17 July 2018, she eloped with Intezar, converted to Islam adopting the new name Iqra and did nikah (marriage as per Islamic sharia) with him.

Her first husband Sanjay filed a missing person complaint on 19 July in Delhi’s New Usmanpur police station.

Iqra (Nidhi) and Intezar started living in a rented house in Jafrabad, which is surprisingly just a few kms away from her earlier home in Brahmpuri. But their Bollywood-esque story took a turn for the worse when Intezar’s first wife, Afroz who was residing in their house in Bijnore, UP, entered the picture.

Presumably, Iqra and Intezar had an argument, and he strangled her to death. Last Wednesday, he took her dead body by car to Bijnore in order to bury her. But his father-in-law Nisar Ahmed tipped off the police and he was arrested.

Bijnore police confirmed that Iqra (aka Nidhi) was murdered, and they have informed Delhi police to take the investigation forward.

Incidentally, few months back we had reported on how several Hindu families residing in the same Brahmpuri area where the victim Iqra (aka Nidhi Sharma) was initially residing, were planning to sell their houses and move out after a dispute with their Muslim neighbours over building of a mosque turned ugly. Similarly, a troubling documentary made some time back showed how another nearby locality in East Delhi, Sundar Nagri, is also witnessing a silent Hindu exodus.

This case would constitute another example of how Hindu girls/women are entrapped & groomed by Muslim men, often with tragic consequences, with this phenomenon being colloquially termed ‘Love Jihad’. One can reasonably argue that such crimes take place within the same religion too, i.e. cases where the man and woman are both Hindu or both Muslim, and that it is wrong to make this into a ‘communal’ issue. Also, from the facts known thus far in this case, the victim was a consenting adult who wasn’t deceived by a false FB identity as is often seen in such cases (although she was definitely deceived about the accused’s marital status).

But if one looks at the sheer volume of such cases which are reported with benumbing frequency in regional media, the pattern is impossible to dismiss unless one is delusional due to ideological blinkers as this writer Sanjukta Basu appears to be in this DailyO piece where she writes “Hindutva’s favourite ‘love jihad’ bogey is a bun prepared out of imaginary flour pulled out of thin air, baked for years in an oven of lies.”

For a minute, let’s forget what the Hindutva ‘fanatics’ are saying. Why are ordinary Hindus living in areas like West UP, and the whole of Hindi-language media (Dainik Jagran, Patrika, Amar Ujala etc) talking about Love Jihad? Why does the data show that in the bulk of sexual crimes involving different religions, the perpetrator is a Muslim and the victim non-Muslim, whereas Muslims are the minority? Are we supposed to bury our heads in the sand when Islamic fundamentalists, whose influence is increasing alarmingly across Bharat, claim that kafirs are hell-bound and hence once is doing God’s work when one converts someone into the Islamic faith, or that people from other communities are somehow morally inferior?

The narrative that left-liberals like Basu are trying to drive, with the help of Constitutional authorities such as ex-VP Hamid Ansari and celebrities like Naseeruddin Shah, is that Muslims and all religious minorities in Bharat today are insecure and living in fear of their lives. But is that truly the case, when incident after incident shows the ground reality is far more complex?


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