Hours After Yechury’s Warning of More ‘Protests’, Maoists Butcher 9 CRPF Jawans in Sukma

Nine CRPF personnel were killed and 10 others injured yesterday in a Maoist terror attack in the Sukma district of Chhattisgarh’s Bastar division.

As per a report in Times of India –

“The attack took place in Kistaram when the personnel were out on a combing operation on the MPV. The team of CRPF jawans of 212 battalion was targeted by rebels who used heavy explosives to blow up the vehicle and had triggered several IEDs, police officials said confirming that nine personnel were killed in the blast.

Today’s attack comes almost 11 days after security personnel killed 10 alleged Naxalites in the state. It also comes six months after 25 CRPF jawans were slaughtered in one of the deadliest attacks by Maoist rebels, or Naxalites. Earlier last year in March, 12 CRPF personnel of a road opening party were ambushed in Sukma.

Still, security forces have had some success dealing with such attacks. As many as 300 Naxals were reportedly killed in separate encounters with security forces in Chhattisgarh in the last two years, said state home minister Ramsewak Paikra to the state Legislative Assembly last month.”

(emphasis added)

It is interesting that Maoists terrorists are referred by the mild term ‘rebels’ by the largest-selling English daily in the country, whereas the official term used by the Govt. of India is ‘Left Wing Extremists.’

And despite the grudging acknowledgement in the TOI article about the security forces gaining ‘some success’ against Naxal terrorists, the fact is that a redrawn counter-insurgency strategy, backed by real-time intelligence through use of modern technology like drones and involving coordinated day and night operations by security personnel, to target Maoists deep inside the jungles has brought down the number of districts afflicted by left-wing extremist violence to 58 in 2017 from 75 districts just 2 years back.

Another interesting factoid, that hints at how the Naxal-affected districts are being slowly integrated in the national mainstream, is that mobile data usage on BSNL Network in Naxal areas Hit 400 GB a day recently.

Yechury & the Great Communist Subterfuge

Sitaram Yechury, general secretary of CPM (Communist Party of India – Marxist) recently issued a warning to the BJP Government in Maharashtra and at the Centre that more ‘protests’ would follow after the recent long march taken out by tribals and farmers from Nashik to Mumbai. CPM is clearly rattled after their heavy electoral defeat in one of their last remaining bastions of Tripura, and hence Yechury’s veiled threat to spread more disaffection and anarchy should be taken seriously.

Yechury had also recently asserted his party’s right to ‘self-defence’ after public outcry over the killing of Youth Congress worker M Shuhaib in CM Pinarayi Vijayan’s hometown Kannur, Kerala last month. Two CPM workers have been arrested for the murder, one of whom is also an accused in murder of an RSS worker in 2016. That case has now been handed over to CBI after a Kerala High Court order.

At this point, let us step back and ask – what is Naxal terrorism? On March 2, 1967, then members of the Communist Party of India (Marxist), led a tribal peasant uprising in Naxalbari village, Siliguri sub-division, Darjeeling district, West Bengal. Since then, all those who subscribed to the idea of an armed over-throw of the state have been generically referred to as Naxalites, the term having its origins in Naxalbari village.

So the roots of Naxal terror are inextricably linked to the CPM. Following the Naxalbari incident, on paper there was a split between the ‘hardline’ CPM elements in favour of a violent ‘revolution’ versus ‘moderates’ who aimed to bring about the same revolution through Constitutional means.

Kerala’s first CM and leading Marxist ideologue EMS Namboodiripad articulated this ‘moderate’ position best when he said –

“The communists’ project in participating in India’s parliamentary institutions was to wreck the constitution from within“!

Article 2 of CPM’s Party Constitution says “Its aim is socialism  and communism through the  establishment of the state of dictatorship of the proletariat.”

And here Vladimir Lenin explains what this “dictatorship of the proletariat” is –

After the Naxalbari violence, the ex-CPM leaders of the ‘revolution’ went to Beijing to meet the founder of the dictatorial one-party Communist rule that defines modern China – Mao Zedong. Mao encouraged the far-left leaders to overthrow the Indian State through armed struggle and install a “People’s Government” in New Delhi – ever since, China has been supporting the Left-wing terror movement in Bharat.

It is pertinent to note two things about China in 1967 – the year when Mao met the Naxal leaders –

  • The disastrous ‘Great Leap Forward’ campaign launched by Mao in 1957 to transform China’s economy from agrarian to industrial, had led to the deadliest famine in history and the deaths of more than 45 million Chinese people between 1958 and 1962.
  • In 1966, Mao had initiated the Cultural Revolution, a program to remove “counter-revolutionary” elements of Chinese society that lasted 10 years and which was marked by violent class struggle, widespread destruction of cultural artifacts and unprecedented elevation of Mao’s personality cult. 

Mao and other mass-murdering brutal Communist dictators like Stalin, Lenin continue to be the role models for Communists of all hues in Bharat, including the ‘mainstream’ political party CPM. The fact is – any Communist Party is wedded to the cult of violence to achieve its political objective.

Urban Naxals

And to the add to the subterfuge of the organized Left, we have a powerful, loosely connected network of Urban Naxalsintellectuals, academics, economists, bureaucrats, lawyers, student activists, artists and the like –  who spread romantic illusions about the Maoist ideology and carry out a strident propaganda against the purported and real inadequacies of the existing state structure.

Urban Naxals are over-ground sympathizers of the Maoist terrorists, who have formed urban front organizations and made deep inroads into premier University campuses like JNU, Jadvapur etc.

In 2010, leftist students in JNU held a night-long ‘celebration’ of the slaughter of 76 CRPF personnel by Naxals in an ambush at Dantewada, Chattisgarh. In 2014, DU English professor G N Saibaba, deputy secretary of the ‘Revolutionary Democratic Front’, was arrested for Naxal links; he was given bail in April this year, while the case against him is still in court. Later that year, J Apparao, an associate professor of Andhra University was arrested by the Visakhapatnam rural police for suspected Maoist links.

In May 2016, villagers from Bastar, Chattisgarh complained to police that visiting faculty from JNU & DU led by DU Professor Nandini Sundar (wife of Siddarth Varadarajan, editor of far-left digital outlet ‘The Wire‘), accompanied by CPI-M workers, were instigating them to support the Naxalite/Maoist terrorist movement. In Nov, one of the tribal villagers who had lodged this complaint, Shamnath Baghel, was brutally murdered by Naxals. Nandini Sundar and 10 others were booked for this murder, based on a complaint by the wife of Shamnath Baghel. 

In May 2017, surrendered Maoist activist Podiyam Panda  revealed the link between the top Maoist leadership and some ‘eminent’ citizens cum activists. Panda said that he used to drive activists from Delhi, including Professor Nandini Sundar and prominent academic & activist Bela Bhatia (wife of Jean Dreze, a Belgium-born development economist who was part of Sonia Gandhi’s extra-constitutional National Advisory Council – NAC – during the UPA years) deep into the forest of Sukma to meet top Maoist leaders.

Security agencies also suspect involvement of urban naxals, who met under the banner of ‘Yalgar Parishad’ in Pune, in the Bhima-Koregaon violence.

Meanwhile, most of the ‘mainstream’ English language media doyens – the Shekhar Guptas, Barkha Dutts etc –  have been tacit supporters of the Urban Naxal cause, as this article by Shri Ashok Chowgule demonstrates.

The Ministry of Home Affairs website succinctly explains the role of Urban Naxals :

  • Front Organisations are created to facilitate mass-mobilisation in semi-urban and urban areas through ostensibly democratic means. Most of the Front Organisations are led by well-educated intellectuals with firm belief in the Maoist insurgency doctrine. These ideologues function as masks to cover the violent nature of the CPI (Maoist) ideology. They also form propaganda/disinformation machinery of the party.
  • They stridently take up issues like ‘displacement of tribals’, ‘corporate exploitation’, ‘human rights violations’ by security forces etc. and often make fantastic claims in this regard which get reported even by the mainstream media. The Front Organisations also skilfully use state structures and legal processes to further the Maoist agenda and weaken the enforcement regime. The important functions of these Organisations include recruitment of ‘professional revolutionaries’, raising funds for the insurgency, creating urban shelters for underground cadres, providing legal assistance to arrested cadres and mass- mobilisation by agitating over issues of relevance/ convenience. The Front Organisations aim to provide short-term democratic subterfuge to cover-up the totalitarian and oppressive nature of the Maoist ideology. The CPI (Maoist) also have a strategic game-plan to create a ‘United Front’ with all like-minded insurgent / terrorist outfits in India. It needs to be remembered that many of these outfits are supported by external forces inimical to India and the CPI (Maoist) consider such alliances as strategic assets..

So while the two main streams of Communism in Bharat – one represented by CPI (Marxist) and the other by CPI (Maoist) – might differ in theory on the means, their end goal remains the same – establishment of a totalitarian Communist dictatorship.

There can be no denying that Communist ideology poses a direct threat to our Constitution & nation.


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