Two men from Punjab arrested for plotting murder of Hindu intellectual and activist Sushil Pandit

Two hit men, Sukhvinder Singh and Lakhan, hired to murder eminent intellectual, communications professional and Hindu activist Shri Sushil Pandit have been have been arrested in Delhi.

Delhi Police said the two arrested men were from Punjab. As per a report in The Tribune

“Deputy Commissioner of Police for Southwest Delhi Devender Arya said Sukhvinder Singh, 25, and Lakhan, 21, were arrested in RK Puram on Saturday. Police said that the two had been hired to kill the activist, Sushil Pandit, by a man the officer identified as “Prince” from Faridkot. The two were to be paid Rs 10 lakh for the hit job, the officer said,

Police have booked the two for abetting an offence punishable with death or life term (Section 115) under the Indian Penal Code and the Arms Act.”

Navbharat Times and Hindustan Times report that Prince Kumar (aka Raj Kumar & Tuti), who ordered the hit, is in jail on a murder charge and is a childhood friend of arrested hitman Lakhan. Police suspects foreign agencies involvement and hence the investigation has been transferred to Delhi Police’s Special Cell.

Four pistols– two foreign-made and two country-made – along with four cartridges and a phone with Pandit’s photo were recovered from the arrested men. The guns are said to be the kind manufactured in Pakistan.

Shri Sushil Pandit is a Kashmiri Hindu in exile; originally from Srinagar in Kashmir, he now lives in New Delhi and runs a brand management company Hive Communications India Private Limited. He is co-founder of ‘Roots in Kashmir’, an initiative to raise public awareness on reclaiming roots that identify Kashmiri Pandits. Shri Pandit is a polymath with a deep understanding of Bharat’s history, civilization and culture and is an articulate and popular voice in both Hindi and English often seen on TV debates and other public forums. In particular, he has brought awareness about the plight of Kashmiri Hindus and the reality of Islamic jihad being waged in the valley.

The Hindustan Times report adds –

“Police officers said they have reasons to believe that the conspiracy was hatched by people based in Pakistan and Dubai, having links with ISI.

“We examined the cellphone recovered from the arrested contract killers and found that they were having conversations with people who are based abroad through Signal, an encrypted messaging platform. The two have identified one of their foreign handlers as Deepak alias King, who they claim is based in Dubai. The calls were made from international numbers,” said one of the officers, who did not want to be named.

When contacted, Pandit said, “For the past many years, I have speaking about and presenting facts about the situation in Kashmir. I have been very vocal about issues related to Kashmiri Pandits and Article 370, and these, I believe, were obviously not liked by people opposing them. The police should probe who all are behind the plot.”

Since 2015, there has been a concerted effort by Pakistan’s ISI and pro-Khalistan elements in countries like Canada, US, UK, Italy, France, Australia, UAE to revive the Khalistan movement. Over a dozen murders of Hindu leaders and activists have occurred in Punjab over the last few years. Khalistan sympathisers violently attacked police during the ongoing farmers’ protest on Republic Day, and unfurled the Sikh religious flag at Red Fort.

Indeed, the trend of silencing assertive and unapologetic Hindu voices can be seen all over the country. While Islamists, Communists, Maoists, Christian radicals and Khalistanis resort to direct physical attacks, their left-liberal enablers and apologists use intellectual and legal tools to target us. One thing unites these seemingly disparate players – an unalloyed hate for Hindus and their Dharma.


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