American website shows Hindu priest’s photo in news about Maulvi castrated by wife for wanting to marry again

American news website New York Post displayed its Hinduphobia by using the pic of a Hindu priest in a news pertaining to a Maulvi being castrated by his wife for planning his third marriage.

The West has a deep-seated hatred for Hindu Dharma that stems from its Hinduphobic nature. It is this phobia that prompted one of the American states to attempt delinking Yoga from Hindu Dharma. It is their Hinduphobia that makes American news media refer to a democratically elected CM Yogi Adityanath as a “militant Hindu supremacist” while at the same time it celebrates Biden being a good Christian.

Bharatiya mainstream media regularly resorts to the tactics subscribed to by New York Post. In its article titled “Third time was definitely no charm for this polyamorous priest”, the website has cleverly tried to convey that a Hindu man was being referred to in the story.

Symbolism and imagery are powerful tools. The website used the image of a rudraksha (sacred Shaivite beads) wearing, ashes smeared, and Diya (oil lamp) holding Hindu priest while the news pertained to one Maulvi Vakil Ahmed.

Readers may recall how Bharatiya media often uses the image of a Hindu sadhu even if the news is regarding a maulvi or padre. The site even refers to the Muslim cleric as a “priest” thereby giving a Hindu connotation. The intention is to not only confuse but also mislead their readers with representative images that are totally wrong.

Although, the site later replaced the image, using a wrong image will only add to the anti-Hindu prejudice of its majorly American readership. Twitteratis have been trending #HinduphobicNYPost and demanding an apology from the website.

(Featured Image Source: Amazon)


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