In the business of maligning Bharat

There was a strange question on Quora recently: “Is India becoming the most hated country?”

It reminded me of the years after Nirbhaya’s rape and murder, when a massive campaign was launched worldwide to portray Indian men as rapists. It was so massive that it reached not only local papers in Germany and probably everywhere else, but a local paper in Nuremberg dedicated half a page to her memory even one year AFTER it had happened.  The impact of this campaign was extraordinarily “successful” if one could use this term:  in March 2015 a biochemistry professor at the University of Leipzig refused admission to her course to a Indian student because of India’s “rape problem”. It even turned out that this was not the only case.

Since this Quora campaign started soon after the news about the Rotherham grooming gangs of mainly Pakistani men came out in the open, I wondered if the questioner wanted to know how well the business of maligning India had progressed and if India is on the way of becoming the most hated country.

Here is my reply:

Oh no, India (Bharat) can never become the most hated country – never mind how much media and missionaries and other vested interests try to portray it as such.

There are too many people in the world who know India, who know her profound philosophy, who know how much she has contributed to civilization, more than any other country in this world, who know how kind and open-minded her people are, how they live and let live and this includes millions of Cow, monkeys, stray dogs, even tigers, leopards, elephants, snakes, etc… in spite of a huge population on little space.

Too many people know how colourful and joyful the atmosphere is during the many festivals, which have mostly a religious nature, they know how alive the country is and how generously India shares her knowledge like Yoga or Ayurveda, how amazing her culture is – music, dance, sculpture, architecture. And also, there are too many people who know Indians who live abroad and know that they are among the best immigrants possible.

But yes, attempts are on to portray India in very poor light, and ‘rapes in India’ and ‘atrocities against minorities’ are preferred news on foreign TV channels, like on German dw (Deutsche Welle) or BBC, when the same channels will not broadcast rapes that happen in Germany or Britain.

A poll in England recently showed that Indians are seen positively (+25), while Pakistanis are seen negatively (-4). The amazing thing is that Indians and Pakistanis are basically the same people. The only difference is that some Indians converted to Islam during the long Muslim rule of their country and at the time of Independence, they demanded their own country as they didn’t want to live together with Hindus. And while hardly any Hindus are left in Pakistan, India did allow Muslims, who did not want to move to Pakistan, stay and their number is even increasing significantly.

So maybe there is one condition: India can never become the most hated country as long as it remains majority Hindu. (End)

This post got an amazing reaction – over 40,000 views within 24 hours, which was exceptionally high. Yet more or less from one moment to the other, the views suddenly dropped substantially, just at the time when I got a notification from Quora. A person with a Muslim name requested me to drop the last sentence of my post.

I didn’t do it, because what i had written is the truth.

(This article first appeared here).


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About the Author

Maria Wirth
Maria Wirth is a German and came to India on a stop over (that’s at least what she thought) on her way to Australia after finishing her psychology studies at Hamburg University. She visited the Ardha Kumbha Mela in Haridwar in April 1980 where she met Sri Anandamayi Ma and Devaraha Baba, two renowned saints. With their blessing she continued to live in India and never went to Australia… She dived into India’s spiritual tradition, sharing her insights with German readers through articles and books. For long, she was convinced that every Indian knows and treasures their great heritage. However, when in recent years, she noticed that there seemed to be a concerted effort to prevent even Indians (and the world) from knowing how valuable this ancient Indian heritage is, she started to point out the unique value of Indian tradition also in English language.